Mathematical Proof Reveals How To Make The Internet More Earthquake-Proof

Posted March 5th, 2014
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From MIT Technology Review

Decentralized networks are naturally robust against certain types of attack. Now one mathematician says advanced geometry shows how to make them even more robust.

One of the common myths about the internet is that it was originally designed during the Cold War to survive nuclear attack. Historians of the internet are quick to point out that this was not at all one of the design goals of the early network, although the decentralized nature of the system turns out to make it much more robust than any kind of centralized network.

See the rest of the story HERE.

Posted in Internet Security, Tech News by |

 
 

Cybersquatters Rush To Claim Brands In The New GTLD Territories

Posted March 4th, 2014
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From FORBES

On Jan. 29, Donuts Inc. launched the first seven of what will be some 1,000 new generic top-level domains or GTLDs, rivals to the familiar .com, .com and .edu endings that now populate most of the known Internet.

Six days later, at 2:04 a.m., Venura de Zoysa of Kingston in New South Wales, Australia, used GoDaddy.com to register the domain name Adidas .clothing. The following day Erwin Strobel of nearby Wagga Wagga registered Burberry.clothing. The next day in Texas, a fellow named Farris Nawas, claiming to live in Austin, registered Carters.clothing at 5:07 a.m. A few hours later Farris Nawas, now in Houston, registered Tommyhilfiger.clothing. And about the same time another person with the same name and address as a wallpaper hanger  in the Houston suburb of Pasadena registered Aeropostale.clothing.

What do these nobodies scattered around the globe have to do with the famous brand names they registered? Not much, probably.

See the full story HERE.

 

Posted in Cybersquatting, gTLDS, Intellectual Property by |

 
 

82 New gTLDs and Counting

Posted January 9th, 2014
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A complete list of the 82 New gTLDs now delegated as of Jan. 2, 2014 from our friends at Com Laude.   newgtlds.comlaude.com

Posted in gTLDS, ICANN, Know Your Domains, Registrars by |

 
 

The List of Current New gTLDs Open for Sunrise Registrations

Posted December 18th, 2013
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From ICANN

TLD Start/End Date Sunrise Sunrise Open Sunrise Close Ltd. Reg. Periods TM Claims Open TM Claims Close
xn--ngbc5azd (شبكة) End Date Sunrise 31 October 2013 29 December 2013 N/A 30 December 2013 30 March 2014
.singles End Date Sunrise 26 November 2013 24 January 2014 N/A 27 January 2014 28 April 2014
.holdings End Date Sunrise 26 November 2013 24 January 2014 N/A 27 January 2014 28 April 2014
.guru End Date Sunrise 26 November 2013 24 January 2014 N/A 27 January 2014 28 April 2014
.clothing End Date Sunrise 26 November 2013 24 January 2014 N/A 27 January 2014 28 April 2014
.ventures End Date Sunrise 26 November 2013 24 January 2014 N/A 27 January 2014 28 April 2014
.bike End Date Sunrise 26 November 2013 24 January 2014 N/A 27 January 2014 28 April 2014
.plumbing End Date Sunrise 26 November 2013 24 January 2014 N/A 27 January 2014 28 April 2014
.camera End Date Sunrise 03 December 2013 31 January 2014 N/A 03 February 2014 05 May 2014
.equipment End Date Sunrise 03 December 2013 31 January 2014 N/A 03 February 2014 05 May 2014
.estate End Date Sunrise 03 December 2013 31 January 2014 N/A 03 February 2014 05 May 2014
.gallery End Date Sunrise 03 December 2013 31 January 2014 N/A 03 February 2014 05 May 2014
.graphics End Date Sunrise 03 December 2013 31 January 2014 N/A 03 February 2014 05 May 2014
.lighting End Date Sunrise 03 December 2013 31 January 2014 N/A 03 February 2014 05 May 2014
.photography End Date Sunrise 03 December 2013 31 January 2014 N/A 03 February 2014 05 May 2014
.land End Date Sunrise 10 December 2013 07 February 2014 N/A 10 February 2014 12 May 2014
.today End Date Sunrise 10 December 2013 07 February 2014 N/A 10 February 2014 12 May 2014
.technology End Date Sunrise 10 December 2013 07 February 2014 N/A 10 February 2014 12 May 2014
.kitchen End Date Sunrise 10 December 2013 07 February 2014 N/A 10 February 2014 12 May 2014
.directory End Date Sunrise 10 December 2013 07 February 2014 N/A 10 February 2014 12 May 2014
.contractors End Date Sunrise 10 December 2013 07 February 2014 N/A 10 February 2014 12 May 2014
.construction End Date Sunrise 10 December 2013 07 February 2014 N/A 10 February 2014 12 May 2014
.diamonds End Date Sunrise 17 December 2013 14 February 2014 N/A 17 February 2014 19 May 2014
.voyage End Date Sunrise 17 December 2013 14 February 2014 N/A 17 February 2014 19 May 2014
.tips End Date Sunrise 17 December 2013 14 February 2014 N/A 17 February 2014 19 May 2014
.enterprises End Date Sunrise 17 December 2013 14 February 2014 N/A 17 February 2014 19 May 2014
.uno End Date Sunrise 09 December 2013 06 February 2014 12 Feb-13 Mar 2014 19 March 2014 16 June 2014
xn--q9jyb4c End Date Sunrise 09 December 2013 14 February 2014 15 Jan-14 Feb 2014 21 February 2014 Perpetual
.menu End Date Sunrise 09 December 2013 06 February 2014 N/A 10 February 2014 16 May 2014
.sexy End Date Sunrise 10 December 2013 07 February 2014 N/A 10 February 2014 12 May 2014
.tattoo End Date Sunrise 10 December 2013 07 February 2014 N/A 10 February 2014 12 May 2014

Our partner, Com Laude is an ICANN Approved Registrar and TMCH Agent. They can assist with New gTLD registrations (the right side of the dot), Sunrise Registration and the TMCH. Tell them we sent you.

And as always, Marksmen is standing by  to assist with issues at the second level (the left side of the dot), either by investigating registrants who have registered your trademark outside of protections you may set up or negotiating to recover them.

We can also negotiate to buy other domain names for which you may not have trademark registrations. Of course, investigations are always done discreetly and all negotiations are executed without disclosing who you are to get you fair market value.

 

 

 

Posted in gTLDS, ICANN by |

 
 

Comment Period for New gTLD Auction Rules Opens Today!

Posted December 17th, 2013
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From ICANN

To gather community input regarding the detailed rules and processes for Auctions to resolve string contention sets in the New gTLD Program. The preliminary auction rules were originally published 1 Nov 2013, they have since been updated based on feedback and will be finalized based on the input of the community from this comment period.

Go HERE to view the rules and commentary info. Comment period closes on 14 January 2014.

Posted in Auctions, gTLDS, ICANN by |

 
 

Trademark Protection in the Wild, Wild World of the Brand New Internet

Posted December 16th, 2013
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Blocking and Tackling

If you didn’t already know, registrations for the New generic Top Level Domains (gTLDs) aren’t coming – they’re here.  Right now. As of today, 218 Registry Agreements have been signed with ICANN.

The ongoing list can be viewed HERE.

As with the gTLDs we’ve come to know (.com, .net, .org) there are Registries (the contracted parties that manage TLDs through authority delegated by ICANN) and Registrars (entities interfacing with you and others to register or maintain registrations of domains in a gTLD).

Oh, and some Registries operate their own Registrars. Got it? Good. Moving on.

 

Sunrise Registrations

As of tomorrow 31 of these New gTLDs will be open for Sunrise Registrations (with approximately 1370 more coming). Go HERE for the ongoing list.

As you might recall from previous gTLD launches, Sunrise Registrations allow you (trademark rights owner) a minimum 30-day head start to register your domain name in a New gTLD before registrations are available to the general public.

The caveat this round is that the term for which you’re applying (your trademark) needs to be in the Trademark Clearinghouse (TMCH), a rights protection mechanism mandated for the New gTLD launches, before you can register in the Sunrise. Haven’t done that yet? Here’s how:

 

Using the TMCH

The TMCH vets IP rights info and supports trademark Sunrise Registrations (required of all New gTLDs.) So once your trademark has been authenticated by the TMCH, it’s qualified to register in EVERY New gTLD Sunrise. Registration options are available for periods of 1 to 10 years.

 

Trademark Claims Service

Another benefit of placing your trademark in the TMCH includes the Trademark Claims service that follows the Sunrise. It is a notification service (also mandated by ICANN for all New gTLDs) to warn both domain name registrants as well as trademark holders of possible infringements.

The service theoretically works thusly:

  1. A potential domain name registrant should get a warning notice when trying to register a domain name that matches your trademark term in the TMCH.
  2. If the domain name registrant continues to register the domain name, you should receive a notification of the registration & can then take any appropriate action.

Be aware that the TMCH doesn’t prevent someone from registering your trademark as a domain name, but if your trademark is in the TMCH, it puts everyone on notice and hopefully deters registration.

The SLD Name Collision Wrinkle

SLD is the acronym for Second Level Domains or where your trademark lives now: www.marksmen.com (the left of the dot).

Last month ICANN announced publication of something called the Alternate Path to Delegation Reports and lists of SLDs to block (almost 10 million) for all eligible proposed New gTLDs.

Translation? If a Registry wants to go forward it has to mitigate occurrence of name collision and Second Level Domain Blocking is the mandated process. There are loads of private domains out there and the SLD Block is to keep you from landing someplace different than you intended.

This blocking also has an impact on any domain pre-registration that might be offered by registrars for the New gTLDs.

 

Don’t Hate the Player, Hate the Game

There are over 1800 applicants for the New gTLDs. Here’s some skinny on 3 of the major players and the nuances they are adding to registrations and protections for Trademark owners.

 

Donuts Inc. has applied for the most names (over 300 registries) for the New gTLDs and has announced some serious acronymic whip-out: DPML. This of course stands for Domains Protected Marks List and is a domain registration blocking option for trademark owners.

If you don’t want to register a domain name in any of the New gTLD registries Donuts owns (which may ultimately be 200 or more) and you don’t want anyone else to either, you can pay just shy of $3K to block the name and not deal with Sunrise Registrations and Trademark Claims Services.

Unfortunately, DPML is not a retroactive choice. By tomorrow, Donuts will have 25 New gTLD registries open for Sunrise Registrations and the earlier you pull the trigger, the better.

The DPML Fact Sheet (and other strategic insight) is available from our partners at Com Laude HERE.

 

Minds + Machines, the registry operator which is set to run more than twenty new gTLDs (including: .beer, .luxe, .surf, .vodka, .work and .london) has set up what they’re calling a Priority Reservation Program.

Domains are being offered on a first-come, first-served basis, with successful Priority Reservations resulting in an automatic registration once the gTLD goes live and domains are available for General Availability.

New gTLDs that can already be reserved under the Priority Reservation Program are: .best, .case, .ceo, .cooking and .horse.

The catch here is that this program will not allow you to register the domain you reserved if the domain is already registered or blocked by a trademark owner with an exact match during the Sunrise period, or if the domain is blocked or reserved by either the registry or by ICANN.

There is a reservation fee and once a domain has been reserved, it will become unavailable for registration by anyone else, through any registrar.

The Priority Reservation period for such participating TLDs will end one week before their corresponding Sunrise period.

 

Uniregistry, which has applied for a number of new gTLDs, including .guitars, .christmas and .blackfriday, has recently launched its .sexy TLD (cue wolf whistle).

Uniregistry offers a 60-day Sunrise, during which domains may be reserved or registered on the basis of trademarks (and certain typos of these trademarks) registered with the TMCH.

Uniregistry will also offer the possibility to block trademarks in each TLD on a cost-recovery basis, with a “once and for all” combined multi-TLD Sunrise Registration application process. Basically, a single Sunrise application can be designated to cover all future TLDs which are managed by Uniregistry.

 

What to Do?

Right Now

It’s probably a good time to decide whether or not you’re going to take advantage of the TMCH. If yes, you’ll need to determine the Sunrise Registrations in which you’d like to participate. You can sidestep some of this process by researching the major players in the space (or have US do that for you) to see what short cuts and cost saving measures are available for the new names under their control.

Our partner, Com Laude is an ICANN Approved Registrar and TMCH Agent. They can assist with New gTLD registrations (the right side of the dot), Sunrise Registration and the TMCH. Tell them we sent you.

Down the Road

Marksmen is standing by as always to assist with issues at the second level — the left side of the dot–, either by investigating registrants who have registered your trademark outside of protections you may set up or negotiating to recover them.

We can also negotiate to buy other domain names for which you may not have trademark registrations. Of course, investigations are always done discreetly and all negotiations are executed without disclosing who you are to get you fair market value.  You can reach us HERE.

Posted in Domain Names, gTLDS, ICANN, Intellectual Property, Registrars, Registries by |

 
 

First New gTLDs Get the Green Light for Delegation

Posted October 21st, 2013
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From ICANN Blog

Today, the first four domains from ICANN’s New Generic Top-Level Domains Program were cleared to proceed to delegation. This marks the start of a measured roll out of new gTLDs, which are designed to expand opportunities for businesses, communities and Internet users around the world.

These first new gTLDs, or strings, are:

  • شبكة (xn--ngbc5azd) – the Arabic word for “Web” or “Network”
    Registry : International Domain Registry Pty. Ltd.
  • онлайн (xn--80asehdb) – Russian for “Online”
    Registry: Core Association
  • сайт (xn--80aswg) – Russian for “Web site”
    Registry: Core Association
  • 游戏 (xn--unup4y) – Chinese for “Game”
    Registry: Spring Fields, LLC

Get the full skinny HERE.

Posted in Domain Names, gTLDS, ICANN, IDNs by |

 
 

The Skinny on IPv6

Posted October 18th, 2013
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From AZZURI DOT ORG

So what is IPv6, and why do I need to know about it?

IPv6 or IP version 6 is the next generation Internet protocol which will eventually replace the current protocol IPv4. IPv6 has a number of improvements and simplifications when compared to IPv4. The primary difference is that IPv6 uses 128 bit addresses as compared to the 32 bit addresses used with IPv4. This means that there are more available IP addresses using IPv6 than are available with IPv4 alone. For a very clear comparison, in IPv4 there is a total of 4,294,967,296 IP addresses. With IPv6, there is a total of 18,446,744,073,709,551,616 IP addresses in a single /64 allocation.

To also help illustrate the sheer magnitude of available IP addresses using IPv6, you can get 65536 /64 allocations out of a single /48, and then 65536 /48 allocations out of a single /32. Many Service Providers are getting /32 allocations from their Regional Internet Registry (RIR) like ARIN, APNIC, RIPE, etc.

A significant difference between IPv6 and IPv4 is the address notation. IPv4 uses a period (.) between each octet, compared to IPv6 which uses a colon (:). With IPv6, if you have a series of zeroes in a row, the address need not be written out completely. You can use a double colon (::) to represent that series of zeroes, however you can only use that once. For example, if you have an address like “2001:0DB8:0000:0003:0000:01FF:0000:002E”, it can be written like “2001:DB8::3:0:1FF:0:2E” or “2001:DB8:0:3:0:1FF::2E”, but would never be written like “2001:DB8::3::1ff::2E”. You also cannot have three colons in a row (:::).

IPv6 availability depends on your Service Provider, either at home or for work. In a dual-stack environment, IPv4 and IPv6 co-exist along the same connection and don’t require any special kind of connection. If dual-stack is not available, you might find yourself using an IP tunneling product or service to bring IPv6 connectivity to you. Even though IPv4 exhaustion has happened at IANA, IPv4 won’t simply disappear off the face of the Internet, but continued explosive growth requiring more unique IP address assignments will mean using more and more of the abundant IPv6 address space.

Many Operating System platforms have native IPv6 support these days. The UNIX based platforms like Linux, BSD (Free, Open, Net) & MacOSX have had IPv6 support enabled for years now. Microsoft Windows starting having native IPv6 support enabled by default with its Vista and Windows 2008 products. Earlier Windows versions like 2000/2003/XP had to have it installed optionally, and did not have as robust features that are available in the newer versions of Windows. Even common web browsing and email software will use IPv6 if it is enabled and available, without having to check off an option or special configuration. The transition from IPv4 to IPv6 is being worked on to be as seamless as possible, and many might not even notice the subtle changes in the coming years.

Posted in Internet Security, IPv6, Tech News by |

 
 

Remembering Jon Postel

Posted October 17th, 2013
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From ICANN

On October 16, 1998, Jon Postel died at the age of 55. The impact of the technical and organizational improvements he made to the Internet during his all too brief life is immeasurable.

At the time of his death, Jon had been working tirelessly to create an entity to manage and maintain the Internet’s address directory – ICANN.

Numerous tributes followed Jon Postel’s death and they continue today. Please take advantage of the links provided below to read about Jon Postel and listen to the remembrances of three Internet pioneers who knew him well.

For more information about Jon Postel, please visit the following pages:

Internet Hall of Fame: Jon Postel

ISOC: Tenth Anniversary Tribute

Wired Magazine: Remembering Jon Postel – And the Day He Hijacked the Internet

“If Jon were here, I am sure he would urge us not to mourn his passing but to celebrate his life and his contributions. He would remind us that there is still much work to be done and that we now have the responsibility and the opportunity to do our part. I doubt that anyone could possibly duplicate his record, but it stands as a measure of one man’s astonishing contribution to a community he knew and loved.”

- Vint Cerf, RFC2468

Posted in ICANN by |

 
 

NGPC Takes Action on GAC Durban Advice on New gTLDs

Posted September 13th, 2013
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From ICANN

12 September 2013

The ICANN Board New gTLD Program Committee (NGPC) met on 10 September 2013 and, among other things, reached a decision regarding the GAC‘s further advice on new gTLDs. The GAC conveyed its advice to the NGPC in its Durban Communiqué , issued on 18 July 2013. Applicants submitted responses to the advice on 23 August 2013.

At its most recent meeting, the NGPC adopted the Durban Scorecard, available at Annex 1 , disposing of all of the GAC‘s further advice with one exception – the NGPC indicated it would take action on the advice concerning the .amazon string at a future meeting.

The NGPC also discussed the remaining open items from the Beijing Communiqué. These include the advice pertaining to protections for IGO names and acronyms; Category 1 Safeguard advice; and Category 2 advice with respect to exclusive access registries. The NGPC and staff are working with the GAC to identify a time and place for further dialogue on these items.

The NGPC will next meet on 28.09.2013 and will provide a further update following that meeting.

The New gTLD evaluation and objection processes remains on track while the NGPC continues its deliberations. The NGPC is prioritizing its work in order to allow the greatest number of applications to move forward as soon as possible. We will continue to provide updates on the NGPC’s progress in responding to the GAC Beijing and Durban Advice.

Posted in GAC, gTLDS, ICANN by |